Difference between revisions of "William H. Sherman"

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Speaker, [[Shakespeare and the Problem of Biography (conference)|Shakespeare and the Problem of Biography]] (Conference, [[2013-2014 Folger Institute programs|2013-2014]])
 
Speaker, [[Shakespeare and the Problem of Biography (conference)|Shakespeare and the Problem of Biography]] (Conference, [[2013-2014 Folger Institute programs|2013-2014]])
  
Participant, [[Transactions of the Book (conference)|Transactions of the Book]] (Conference, 2001-2002)
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Participant, [[Transactions of the Book (conference)|Transactions of the Book]] (Conference, [[2001-2002 Folger Institute programs|2001-2002]])
  
Director, [[The Early Modern Book (seminar)|The Early Modern Book]] (Masters Seminar, 1997-1998)
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Director, [[The Early Modern Book (seminar)|The Early Modern Book]] (Masters Seminar, [[1997-1998 Folger Institute programs|1997-1998]])
  
 
===Public Programs===
 
===Public Programs===
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[[Category:Long-term]]
 
[[Category:Long-term]]
 
[[Category:Scholarly programs]]
 
[[Category:Scholarly programs]]
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[[Category:Public programs]]
 
[[Category:2013-2014]]
 
[[Category:2013-2014]]
 
[[Category:2011-2012]]
 
[[Category:2011-2012]]
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[[Category:2001-2002]]
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[[Category:1997-1998]]

Revision as of 09:30, 28 August 2014

This page reflects a scholar's association with the Folger Institute.

William H. Sherman is a Professor of English at the University of York,

Long-term fellowship

Knowledge is Power: Renaissance Intelligence and Its Modern Legacies (Mellon, 2011-2012)

This project offers a new account of intelligence in the English Renaissance, when the relationship between knowledge and power was closer and more complicated, perhaps, than at any time before or since. After all, it was Francis Bacon who coined the famous axiom, “Knowledge is power,” and his life and writings offer ample testimony to the connections between the difference spheres of intelligence—learning or wit on the one hand and espionage on the other. The first part will trace the connections between scholarship and spying in Renaissance texts, careers, and institutions, and the second will explore the surprising lives of modern scholars who combined intellectual expertise on Renaissance history and literature with work in the field of intelligence, including Conyers Read, William Friedman, and Rosalie Colie.

Scholarly Programs

Speaker, Shakespeare and the Problem of Biography (Conference, 2013-2014)

Participant, Transactions of the Book (Conference, 2001-2002)

Director, The Early Modern Book (Masters Seminar, 1997-1998)

Public Programs

Decoding the Renaissance, Exhibition at the Folger, (Opens November 2014)

Service

Editorial Board, Shakespeare Quarterly