Difference between revisions of "Shakespeare's Birthday Lecture: "Shakespeare's Life Stories""

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For more past programming from the [[Folger Institute]], please see the article [[Folger Institute scholarly programs archive]].
 
For more past programming from the [[Folger Institute]], please see the article [[Folger Institute scholarly programs archive]].
  
This was a lecture given by [[Stephen Grenblatt]] on April 25, 2016, as part of "[[Shakespeare's Theatrical Documents (symposium)]]," and the 2016 Anniversary Lecture Series.  
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This was a lecture given by [[Stephen Greenblatt]] on April 25, 2016, as part of the 2016 Anniversary Lecture Series.  
  
 
"In this harsh world draw thy breath in pain,” the dying Hamlet tells Horatio, “To tell my story.” Professor Greenblatt's lecture is about what it means for Hamlet – and for Shakespeare – to believe that life is a story that can and must be told.   
 
"In this harsh world draw thy breath in pain,” the dying Hamlet tells Horatio, “To tell my story.” Professor Greenblatt's lecture is about what it means for Hamlet – and for Shakespeare – to believe that life is a story that can and must be told.   
  
Listen to the lecture here.
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Listen to the lecture [https://soundcloud.com/folgershakespearelibrary/shakespeare-anniversary-lecture-series-stephen-greenblatt here].
  
Read the transcript.  
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'''Lecturer''': [[Stephen Greenblatt]] is the John Cogan University Professor of the Humanities at Harvard University. He has written more than a dozen books, including the bestseller, ''Will in the World: How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare'', and ''The Swerve: How the World Became Modern''. He has recently won Norway’s Holberg Prize, which is awarded annually to scholars who have made outstanding contributions to research in the arts, humanities, the social sciences, law, or theology.
  
'''Lecturer''': [[Stephen Greenblatt]] is the John Cogan University Professor of the Humanities at Harvard University. He has written more than a dozen books, including the bestseller, ''Will in the World: How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare'', and ''The Swerve: How the World Became Modern''. He has recently won Norway’s Holberg Prize, which is awarded annually to scholars who have made outstanding contributions to research in the arts, humanities, the social sciences, law, or theology.
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[[Category: Folger Institute]]
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[[Category: Scholarly programs]]
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[[Category: Program archive]]
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[[Category: Public programs]]
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[[Category: Shakespeare's Birthday Lecture]]
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[[Category:Lecture]]
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[[Category:2015-2016]]

Latest revision as of 11:15, 7 July 2016

"This article is about the annual Shakespeare Birthday lecture. For other articles about Shakespeare's Birthday, see Shakespeare's Birthday (disambiguation).

For more past programming from the Folger Institute, please see the article Folger Institute scholarly programs archive.

This was a lecture given by Stephen Greenblatt on April 25, 2016, as part of the 2016 Anniversary Lecture Series.

"In this harsh world draw thy breath in pain,” the dying Hamlet tells Horatio, “To tell my story.” Professor Greenblatt's lecture is about what it means for Hamlet – and for Shakespeare – to believe that life is a story that can and must be told.

Listen to the lecture here.

Lecturer: Stephen Greenblatt is the John Cogan University Professor of the Humanities at Harvard University. He has written more than a dozen books, including the bestseller, Will in the World: How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare, and The Swerve: How the World Became Modern. He has recently won Norway’s Holberg Prize, which is awarded annually to scholars who have made outstanding contributions to research in the arts, humanities, the social sciences, law, or theology.