Difference between revisions of "Replacement Lives: An Evening with David Bezmozgis, Boris Fishman, and Lara Vapnyar (2015)"

(Created page with "This event happened on October 19th 2015 at Folger Theatre with PEN/Faulkner. In its 17th year, the DCJCC Jewish Literary Festival celebrates the work of established an...")
 
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This event happened on October 19th 2015 at Folger Theatre with [[PEN/Faulkner.]]   
 
This event happened on October 19th 2015 at Folger Theatre with [[PEN/Faulkner.]]   
  
In its 17th year, the DCJCC Jewish Literary Festival celebrates the work of established and emerging authors who explore and engage in Jewish life through words and ideas. Learn more about it here.
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In its 17th year, the DCJCC Jewish Literary Festival celebrates the work of established and emerging authors who explore and engage in Jewish life through words and ideas.  
  
 
David Bezmozgis, Boris Fishman, and Lara Vapnyar were all born in the Soviet Union in the 1970s and moved to North America as part of a wave of Jewish emigration. All three write about leaving behind a country that will soon disappear and a history that is continually being re-written. Join us for a discussion of East and West, language and identity, the old Russia and the new.
 
David Bezmozgis, Boris Fishman, and Lara Vapnyar were all born in the Soviet Union in the 1970s and moved to North America as part of a wave of Jewish emigration. All three write about leaving behind a country that will soon disappear and a history that is continually being re-written. Join us for a discussion of East and West, language and identity, the old Russia and the new.

Revision as of 08:54, 27 July 2020

This event happened on October 19th 2015 at Folger Theatre with PEN/Faulkner.

In its 17th year, the DCJCC Jewish Literary Festival celebrates the work of established and emerging authors who explore and engage in Jewish life through words and ideas.

David Bezmozgis, Boris Fishman, and Lara Vapnyar were all born in the Soviet Union in the 1970s and moved to North America as part of a wave of Jewish emigration. All three write about leaving behind a country that will soon disappear and a history that is continually being re-written. Join us for a discussion of East and West, language and identity, the old Russia and the new.