Difference between revisions of "Breaking News: Renaissance Journalism and the Birth of the Newspaper"

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''Breaking News: Renaissance Journalism and the Birth of the Newspaper'' was part of the [[Exhibitions at the Folger]].
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''Breaking News: Renaissance Journalism and the Birth of the Newspaper,'' part of the [[Exhibitions at the Folger]], opened September 25, 2008 and closed on January 31, 2009. The exhibition was curated by [[Chris Kyle|Chris R Kyle]] and [[Jason Peacey]] with [[Elizabeth Walsh]]. The exhibition [http://shop.folger.edu/store/165034%21165/Breaking+News%3A+Renaissance+Journalism catalog] can be purchased from the Folger Shop.
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The first newspaper arrived in England from an Amsterdam publisher on December 2, 1620. Containing the latest foreign news, this publication immediately sparked a huge demand for up-to-the-minute reports on domestic and world events. From stories of war to lurid accounts of celebrity scandals among the royal families of Europe, journalism exploded into the world of Renaissance England. Gossip in the taverns and conversations among the political classes gave way to the phenomenon of a wide cross-section of the populace reading the events of the days and weeks in cheaply-printed serial publications.
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The early English newspaper has left an indelible mark upon modern news culture. Even in its earliest manifestation, we see the emergence of the dramatic headline and the editorial, the development of tabloids and advertising, and the advent of attempts at state censorship and control over the presses. The content of the newspapers on exhibit reflects not only politics but the wider cultural, social and economic life of the times they covered.
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This exhibition traces the development of journalism and the newspaper in England, from the manuscript antecedents of the coranto form to the introduction of newspapers in America in the late seventeenth century, and the birth of the first daily newspaper in England in 1702.
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== Contents of the exhibition ==
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== Supplemental materials ==
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Listen to a segment from [http://www.onthemedia.org ''On the Media''] about this exhibition or [http://www.onthemedia.org/story/131269-the-news-then-and-now/transcript/ read the transcript].
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<html5media>http://www.folger.edu/documents/otm010909h.mp3</html5media>
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=== [[Breaking News children's exhibition]] ===
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=== Audio Tour ===

Revision as of 19:38, 15 January 2015

Breaking News: Renaissance Journalism and the Birth of the Newspaper, part of the Exhibitions at the Folger, opened September 25, 2008 and closed on January 31, 2009. The exhibition was curated by Chris R Kyle and Jason Peacey with Elizabeth Walsh. The exhibition catalog can be purchased from the Folger Shop.

The first newspaper arrived in England from an Amsterdam publisher on December 2, 1620. Containing the latest foreign news, this publication immediately sparked a huge demand for up-to-the-minute reports on domestic and world events. From stories of war to lurid accounts of celebrity scandals among the royal families of Europe, journalism exploded into the world of Renaissance England. Gossip in the taverns and conversations among the political classes gave way to the phenomenon of a wide cross-section of the populace reading the events of the days and weeks in cheaply-printed serial publications.

The early English newspaper has left an indelible mark upon modern news culture. Even in its earliest manifestation, we see the emergence of the dramatic headline and the editorial, the development of tabloids and advertising, and the advent of attempts at state censorship and control over the presses. The content of the newspapers on exhibit reflects not only politics but the wider cultural, social and economic life of the times they covered.

This exhibition traces the development of journalism and the newspaper in England, from the manuscript antecedents of the coranto form to the introduction of newspapers in America in the late seventeenth century, and the birth of the first daily newspaper in England in 1702.

Contents of the exhibition

Supplemental materials

Listen to a segment from On the Media about this exhibition or read the transcript.

Breaking News children's exhibition

Audio Tour